In the heat of the day

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Most of my readers will have been familiar with the 1967 movie, “In the Heat of the Night” starring Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger, later to be followed in the ’80s and ’90s by the TV series of the same name, starring Carroll O’Connor and Howard Rollins and dealing with life in the Southern USA. 

Fewer will be familiar with the 1989 movie “Heat of the Day,” picturing life in London during WWII when bombs exploded all around the city. 

Today in our time it feels like we are being bombarded by so called political bombshells fueled by irresponsible news media personnel and laced with inaccurate reporting and blatant lies. It is like the London blitz all over again.

In the heat of the day we need to cool it and I don’t just mean our physical bodies. Today as in most days here in Kalaupapa I spend time on the horizontal accompanied by my longest-serving cat, Babyface Bailey, who, if in the house at that time, lays at my feet or on my feet. Here I can cool off this old body from the heat of the afternoon sun and at the same time cool my thoughts which also can get overheated at times. 

I would advise you readers to do the same, especially if you have reached my tender age. Of course I do not advise it if you are still in the workforce, as that might be reflected in your paycheck at the end of the week.

Much of the talk today by politicians is on global warming and it does seem that this summer has been warmer than in the past, but then some of our winters have been cooler than in the past. 

So I personally wonder whether those pushing some wild theories that we hear are spending too much time in the sun or are doing so at the behest of alternate power companies. 

In my own homeland people who have provided their own source of household heat and cooked their meals using peat, as their ancestors have for centuries, will soon no longer be permitted to cut turf peat. What idiot can convince me that solar panels can work as well as peat in the west of Ireland? 

I started this script after my daily siesta this afternoon and I hope that it makes sense. Even here in Kalaupapa where we are blessed with cooling trade winds on this the north side of Molokai, the sun can frazzle one’s brain. So it is prudent to stay indoors if possible in the heat of the day. 

Aloha.

Anchor columnist Father Patrick Killilea, SS.CC., is pastor of St. Francis Parish in Kalaupapa, Hawaii.


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